PUSH UP

Methodology developed by Krešimir Pažin

What’s a bad push-up?

 

 

This is a bad push-up because the athlete:

Lowers the head in the first stage of the movement to get closer to the ground and has no power to lower the chest.

Bends the lumbar part of the spine.

Moves the body to the left and right because first he raises the left and the right side of the body.

 

What’s a good push-up?

The features of a proper push-up are:

 

A controlled movement of lowering the breasts to the ground, which lasts for 3-5 seconds, and when the chest reaches the ground, by pushing the body the body is raised to its initial position so that during the whole movement the head and the entire spine are in a neutral position

If we imagine a line covering the length of the body from the feet to the vertex of the head, the position of any part of the leg, hull or head should not move in relation to that line.

(Learning methodology developed by Krešimir Pažin and explained with a help of the Croatian National Team player Luka Cindrić and his coach Robert Magdić)

They often ask me:

How many push-ups should my son Luka be able to do at the age of 10 or 12?

 

Until he can do one proper push-up, he should not do any at all.

How do we teach children to do a proper push-up?

The first step is to teach Luka to keep the spine in neutral position by performing isometric exercises to develop the ability to maintain that position. For that we use a lightweight ball that easily falls from Luka’s back whenever they are not in perfect balance.

 

After that, we move to the more complex movement:

By lifting the feet from the floor we encourage the activation of the muscles necessary to maintain that neutral position.

 

After that, we move to the more complex movement of lifting the palm from the ground.

Moving in different directions creates an additional incentive to activate these muscles.

When Luka is capable of performing the “bear” exercise, we move on to the „two hand planck“, and the method is the same.

The first step is to teach Luka to keep the spine in neutral position by performing isometric exercises to develop the ability to maintain that position. For that we use a lightweight ball that easily falls from Luka’s back whenever they are not in perfect balance.

 

 

By lifting the feet from the floor we encourage the activation of the muscles necessary to maintain that neutral position.

 

 

After that, we move to the more complex movement of lifting the palm from the ground.

 

Moving in different directions creates an additional incentive to activate these muscles.

As Luka, by performing only position retention, will not fully strengthen the muscles of the arm and shoulder belt, there is a possibility that he will not be able to “keep” himself in a controlled position while lowering and lifting.

That’s why they will perform push-ups on an incline that we will slightly decrease to the push-up position on the ground. In these phases, we do not use a ball, and it is important that Luka maintains a good spine position when performing.

The last step is to perform a push-up on the ground with a ball on the lumbar spine, and when a player is able to do such a push-up, we say he is capable of doing one push-up.

 

Only then we can tell him to do 2, 3 or more sets.

Experience shows that learning push-ups using this method is good because Luka is interested and finds performing all the exercises a challenge.

 

3 Responses

  1. December 26, 2018

    […] (Learning methodology developed by Krešimir Pažin and explained with a help of the Croatian National Team player Luka Cindrić and his coach Robert Magdić) […]

  2. January 2, 2019

    […] (Learning methodology developed by Krešimir Pažin and explained with a help of the Croatian National Team player Luka Cindrić and his coach Robert Magdić) […]

  3. January 4, 2019

    […] Learning methodology developed by Krešimir Pažin and explained with a help of the Croatian National Team player Luka Cindrić and his coach Robert Magdić […]

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